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Title Charles Armand document set
Date 1780 August 26 [letter]; 1782 January 25 [letter]; n.d. [letter]; n.d. [3 engravings]
Description 3 items - 3 leaf pamphlet with letter and engraving; 3 leaf pamphlet with letter and engraving; 3 leaf pamphlet with letter and engraving.
People La Rouërie, Charles Armand Tuffin, marquis de, 1751-1793

Reid, Governor
Search Terms Continental Congress
Revolutionary War
American Revolution
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Valley Forge, Pennsylvania
Scope & Content Charles Armand document set. 3 items - 3 leaf pamphlet with letter and engraving; 3 leaf pamphlet with letter and engraving; 3 leaf pamphlet with letter and engraving. First two letters are in English with dates and names, the third is in French with no dates or names.

The first document is a letter of transmittal and recommendation of favorable consideration of a French soldier's petition, written to Governor Reid in Philadelphia, 1780 August 26.

Charles Armand, also known as the Marquis de la Rouerie, was a brave, gay and witty Brigadier General, who, when only 24 years of age, commanded a corps of light armed troops at Valley Forge.

Possibly James Randolph Reid, born in Adams County, Pa., August 11, 1750. Delegate to Continental Congress from Pennsylvania, 1787. Died in Middlesex, Cumberland County, Pa., January 25, 1789. Burial location unknown.

The second document is written from Charlotte Ville, Virginia, 1782 January 25, to Annapolis, Maryland, and is addressed to the Governor of Maryland, requesting permission to recruit in Maryland pursuitant to his orders from Congress and Commander in Chief.

The third document is a letter written in French, with no obvious address or dates.
Admin/Biographical History John S. H. Fogg, compiler of this collection, born in Eliot, Maine. Graduated from Bowdoin College in 1846, earned a degree in medicine from Harvard College in 1850 and established his practice in South Boston, Massachusetts. While a student at Bowdoin, Dr. Fogg developed a lifelong interest in collecting autograph letters and documents, particularly those relating to the history of the United States. Paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair in 1873, Fogg gave undivided attention to building his magnificent collection. Beginning in 1875, he had completed the task by 1881.