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Title David Thompson letter to Anthony Barclay
Date Sept. 3, 1821
Description 1 letter; 2 pages
People Thompson, David, 1770-1857
Search Terms International Boundary Commission
Treaty of Ghent
Scope & Content
Sepr 3. 1821. T? coy?

The Honorable Anthony Barclay
Sir/
Having waited
until now in hopes of hearing from Mr. Hale, I at
length write, altho' I have very little to commu-
=nicate At stated in my letter of August 13th I
waited on General Porter, and explained the
business of Lake Huron; he was sorry I had not
obtained a Map of that Lake, yet appeared well
satisfied, that the observed places would be suf-
=ficient to warrant a decision. General Porter
informed me he had wrote you, the Board would
meet at Utica on the 24 Sepr and in my telling
him it was impossible we could get our share
of the work done by that time; he replied, that
what drawings &c could not be done here, would
be finished at Utica. We therefore, unless
we receive other orders from you, prepare to leave
this place on the 17th Inst and proceed to Utica
with all the maps &c &c as well as several rough
materials, which ought otherwise to remain, all
which we shall do our best to get safe to Utica.

On the 15 Aug we came to this place, but could
find no space rooms under the enormous price
of 10 $ per week. The criminal court then sitting
we procured a large room for an office, with Board
lodging &c &c at 4 $ per week each person, which we
think reasonable.

end p1
begin p2

I have just received a message from
General Porter in which he wishes us to join
him on the 15th Instant, this would make us lose
time; and I have proposed the 17 inst.
We are incessantly employed on the maps
&c &c, and shall exert ourselves to get as much
as possible done, and the drawings &c &c executed
will I hope give satisfaction
I am sir, with respect
your most Obedient
and humble Servant
David Thompson


Admin/Biographical History This compiled collection includes papers from Thomas Barclay (1753-1830), his son, Anthony Barclay (1792-1877), John Ogilvy (d. 1819), Ward Chipman (1754-1824), Ward Chipman, [Jr.] (1787-1851), David Thompson (1770-1857), Alexander Wadsworth Longfellow (1814-1901) and others related to the determination of the boundary between Canada and the United States. Materials include government documents, correspondence, maps, surveys, diaries and Indian deeds related to the determination of the boundary between Canada and the United States, particularly of the years of the St. Croix Commission, 1796-1812, the Commissions appointed after the Treaty of Ghent, 1814-1838, and the Commissions under the Treaty of Washington, 1842. Papers of diplomats appointed by the British and American governments include the correspondence of explorers who surveyed the boundary zones and of several other diplomats, political officers and aids who became involved in the arbitration of the border. The explorations around the Island of St. Croix by Robert Pagan and Native American Francis Joseph Neptune, and a map by Chief Wasp of the Ojibway tribe in the vicinity of Ontario and Minnesota are noteworthy.